… “and the wisdom to know the difference.”

Last week I had a meltdown.  I’d been working on a project I thought would take two or three weeks.  Six weeks into the project not one, but two issues, both outside of my control, surfaced.

One’s been lingering for a couple of weeks and has been exasperated by the weather.  The second is one that could cause a further delay, expense, and effort on my part.  It was that second one that pushed me over the edge.

Fortunately, it was the end of an incredibly long day, so I had the chance to distance myself from the situation and gain perspective.  The next morning, I thought it through.

  1. I’ve moved these issues as far along as I can. There are other companies responsible for the next steps.  My only recourse is to ensure they’re aware of and accept responsibility for each issue, get a commitment, then stay in contact with them.
  2. There are a lot of other activities requiring my attention and effort.
  3. Stewing over this issue is a non-value add activity.

Once I got to #3, I had a blinding flash of the obvious when the last phrase of the Serenity Prayer, “and the wisdom to know the difference.” came to mind.  I started the day by contacting each company, then got back to those other activities that I could complete.

Even though I didn’t yell, curse, or cry, I’m still embarrassed about that meltdown.

Leah Ward-Lee is a management consultant and business writer based in Dallas, Texas and the author of $1,000 Start-Ups.  Her next book, The Executive’s Toolbox, will be released soon.

Published by Leah Ward-Lee

Leah Ward-Lee, the author of "$1,000 Start-Ups", is a serial micro-entrepreneur. She opened her first business at ten after lobbying for and receiving a shoe shine kit for Christmas. She pulled her wagon through the neighborhood, going door-to-door, offering to shine her neighbor’s shoes for twenty-five cents a pair. Once her wagon was full, she took the shoes home and polished them. Unfortunately that business was short-lived. She hadn’t tagged the shoes and couldn’t remember whose shoes were whose, so her dad went with her to retrace the route until every pair was returned. Since then she’s had businesses developing and teaching college courses, instructing aerobic classes, owning half a plane that was rented to a flight and maintenance school, and renting homes. She’s also owned a consignment store, a gift shop, a gift basket business, a consulting firm, hosted The Executive Toolbox (a weekly radio show), and a publishing company. She also spent twenty years in the US Army, served as the Chief Information and Technical Officer for two major insurance companies, and has a second career as a management consultant. Leah resides in Dallas, TX and on Amelia Island with Sammy and Goliath, her two rescue dogs.

Leave a comment

Comment

%d bloggers like this: